Alzheimer’s And Aluminum In Brain Tissue – True Link Found By Scientist

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By Heather Callaghan

We’re living in the “Age of Aluminum” according to Chris Exley, PhD of England. Do you associate aluminum exposure with Alzheimer’s disease? Despite the correlation between the neurotoxin and brain disease over the decades, a definite cause hadn’t been clinically presented.

Perhaps you’ve heard of the intriguing work of Professor Chris Exley who found that drinking certain mineral waters each day is the prime method of easily and safely removing aluminum from the body.

Is Aluminium Involved in Alzheimer’s Disease and Can Silicon-Rich Mineral Waters Protect Against Aluminium’s Involvement in the Disease?

When we last spoke to Dr. Exley, he had already tested silicon-rich waters like Volvic mineral water on human test subjects to discover that some of them had regained their cognitive abilities. Mineral water that contains high amounts of naturally occurring silica will draw aluminum safely out of the body.

At the time we spoke last year, he was raising funds to truly test the aluminum Alzheimer’s link.

This previous lack of clinical trial led to dismissal and derision from corporations and the part of the scientific community that perhaps received their funds from corporations. As you might imagine, corporations weren’t exactly chomping at the bit to fund Exley’s quest to prove the link.

We believe Exley’s newest work will provide hope and excitement to our readers. Be sure to listen to our interview after the press release.


Press Release: Familial Alzheimer’s and aluminum in brain tissue

By Professor Chris Exley via Sane Vax

There has been a strong link between human exposure to aluminium and the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease for half a century or more. However, without definite proof, there is still no consensus in the scientific community about the role of this known neurotoxin in this devastating brain disease.

The latest research from my group, published in the Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology, makes this link even more compelling. In my view, the findings are unequivocal in their confirmation of a role for aluminium in some if not all Alzheimer’s disease.

At the very least, these new results should encourage everyone and even those who have steadfastly maintained that aluminium has no role in the disease to think again.

I don’t believe that is the only factor, but I think it is an important one which should be considered very seriously.

When our new results are put into the context of what is already known about aluminium and Alzheimer’s disease their significance becomes overwhelming and compelling.

We already know that the aluminium content of brain tissue in late-onset or sporadic Alzheimer’s disease is significantly higher than is found in age-matched controls. So, individuals who develop Alzheimer’s disease in their late sixties and older also accumulate more aluminium in their brain tissue than individuals of the same age without the disease.

Even higher levels of aluminium have been found in the brains of individuals, diagnosed with an early-onset form of sporadic (usually late onset) Alzheimer’s disease, who have experienced an unusually high exposure to aluminium through the environment (e.g. Camelford) or through their workplace. This means that Alzheimer’s disease has a much earlier age of onset, for example, fifties or early sixties, in individuals who have been exposed to unusually high levels of aluminium in their everyday lives.

We now show that some of the highest levels of aluminium ever measured in human brain tissue are found in individuals who have died with a diagnosis of familial Alzheimer’s disease.

The levels of aluminium in brain tissue from individuals with familial Alzheimer’s disease are similar to those recorded in individuals who died of an aluminium-induced encephalopathy while undergoing renal dialysis.

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